Media Releases

Media Releases

Warrenton Rural Volunteer Fire Department Receives $360,000 Zero-Interest Loan to Purchase New Truck

Warrenton Rural Volunteer Fire Department received a $360,000 zero-interest loan to help pay for their new pumper-tanker. Halifax Electric Membership Corporation is playing a supporting role in the purchase of the new fire truck by facilitating a loan funded from the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Rural Economic Development Loan and Grant (REDLG) program.

A check presentation was held on Tuesday, February 17 at the fire station in Warrenton and the new truck was on display. “The partnership between our fire department and Halifax EMC was instrumental in making this new fire apparatus purchase possible,” said Walter Gardner, mayor of Warrenton and chief of Warrenton Rural VFD.  “There are lots of smiles of gratitude hidden by these masks!”

The USDA’s REDLG program provides zero-interest funds to local electric cooperatives who in turn lend the money to local entities for projects that support rural areas. Payments from organizations who have received REDLG loans managed by Halifax EMC in the past are placed into the co-op’s Community Revolving Loan fund which allows these federal funds to be re-loaned in the local communities.

“We’re proud to be able to support the Warrenton Rural Volunteer Fire Department in their mission to serve and protect,” Halifax EMC Executive Vice President Charles H. Guerry said. “This zero-interest loan program through the USDA allows us to support rural organizations in our communities far beyond our electric service. We want our communities to be great places to live, work and raise a family.”

Pictured with the new pumper-tanker truck are: (front row left to right): Mark Wethington, Warrenton town commissioner; Stan Brothers, Halifax EMC board president; Charles Guerry, Halifax EMC executive vice president; Emmanuel Gbedee, the Office of Congressman G.K. Butterfield; Walter Gardner, mayor of Warrenton and chief of Warrenton Rural VFD; Walter Powell, WRVFD member and Warren County commissioner; Mary Hunter, Warrenton Town commissioner; and Tare “T” Davis, chairman, Warren County commission. (back row left to right): John Blalock, WRVFD treasurer and Warrenton town commissioner; Harry Williams, Halifax EMC board member; Joey Nelson, the Office of Senator Thom Tillis; Macon Robertson, Halifax EMC board member; and Robert Davie, Town of Warrenton administrator.

Media Releases, Spotlight

Ways to Save Energy and Money During Cold Weather

During the winter, the drop in temperature can cause a household’s electricity use to increase as heating systems work harder to keep homes warm. And with many people spending more time at home during the pandemic, energy use may increase more sharply in comparison to previous years.

Helping our members save energy and money is always a priority for Halifax EMC, but when it’s cold outside, energy awareness and efficiency become especially important.

“We know that energy use typically goes up during the coldest and hottest months of the year,” said Brady Martin, Manager of Marketing and Economic Development for Halifax EMC, which serves approximately 10,000 members in Halifax, Warren, and parts of Nash and Martin counties. “The good news is there are simple steps our members can take to help control their energy use and associated costs, and our co-op also offers a number of tools to make it easier to monitor and manage household energy patterns.”

Some quick and easy things co-op members can do to help reduce the amount of energy they use this season include:

Embracing natural sunlight. On bright, sunny days, open your blinds and allow the natural heat from the sun’s rays to warm up your home. Be sure to close them at night and keep your windows sealed to lock cold air away.

Lowering your thermostat. Instead of maintaining higher temperatures indoors, opt for a consistent temperature – no higher than 68 degrees – to avoid overworking your heater. Extreme weather conditions cause HVAC systems to work harder, which leads to higher energy consumption and costs, so it’s more cost effective to bundle up with a blanket and cozy socks instead of turning the thermostat up.

Saving hot water. If you’ve never adjusted your water heater, it is likely set to 140 degrees. By lowering it to 120 degrees, you can benefit from reduced energy use and cost savings. Other quick changes that make a big difference are investing in a low-flow shower head to cut back on hot water use, washing clothes in cold water, and running dishwashers and laundry machines with full loads, preferably at off-peak times such as midday, late evening and overnight.

Turning off lights and devices when not in use. Make sure to turn off lights, space heaters and other appliances when you are not using them. Consider installing a power strip that allows you to easily unplug devices that constantly use energy even when turned off, such as TVs and game systems.

Making simple switches. Replace traditional light bulbs with energy-efficient LEDs, and switch ceiling fans to run in a clockwise direction to help push warmer air down.

Staying on top of maintenance. Have your heating system serviced regularly to ensure optimal performance, and change air filters monthly to make sure your system is operating as efficiently as possible. These two simple tips can save you big money.

Investing in smart technology for your home. Smart devices, such as WiFi-connected thermostats and water heater controls, can help take the stress out of energy management. According to Energy.gov, you can save as much as 10 percent on heating and cooling per year by turning your thermostat back 7-10 degrees for eight hours a day in the winter and by setting it that much higher in the summer. This adjustment happens automatically with a smart device and can be programmed to occur when you’re away from home or asleep.

In addition to these tips, Halifax EMC offers tools to help members monitor and manage their energy use. Members may log into their account to view kWh usage as well as set up high energy use alerts. Consistent account monitoring allows members to adjust energy habits before they are surprised with a high electric bill the next month.

These tips and tools are part of Halifax EMC’s commitment to building a brighter future for the people and the local communities we serve. In addition to ensuring the delivery of reliable, affordable and sustainable power, this vision emphasizes the importance of innovation and ongoing community support. With a long-term goal of net zero carbon emissions by 2050, Halifax EMC is leveraging new and existing technologies to shape the future of the electric grid and better serve our members, both now and in the years to come.

Media Releases

Roanoke-Wildwood Volunteer Fire Department Receives $360,000 Zero-Interest Loan to Purchase New Truck

Roanoke-Wildwood Volunteer Fire Department received a ten-year, $360,000 zero-interest loan from Halifax Electric Membership Corporation to purchase a 2019 Class A Pumper truck.

The funds were made possible primarily by a $300,000 grant from the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Rural Economic Development Loan and Grant program (REDLG) awarded to Halifax EMC for their Community Revolving Loan program. The program provides zero-interest funds to local electric cooperatives who in turn lend the money to local entities for projects that support rural areas.

“On behalf of Roanoke-Wildwood Volunteer Fire Department, I would like to thank the USDA and Halifax Electric for the hard work and dedication to provide us this zero-interest loan,” Roanoke-Wildwood VFD President Eric Davis said. “Their continued involvement in the community is essential and greatly appreciated amongst community members.”

“Commitment to communities is one of the core values that has guided us since we were founded in 1938,” Halifax EMC Executive Vice President Charles H. Guerry said. “This zero-interest loan program through the USDA allows us to support rural organizations in our communities far beyond our electric service. We want our communities to be great places to live, work and raise a family.”

Pictured with the new truck are: (left to right) Charles Guerry, Halifax EMC executive vice president; Emmanuel Gbedee, the Office of Congressman G.K. Butterfield; BettyJo Shepheard, the Office of U.S. Senator Richard Burr; Trey Lewis, the Office of U.S. Senator Thom Tillis; Lorenzo Wilkins, Roanoke-Wildwood VFD chief; and Eric Davis, Roanoke- Wildwood VFD president.

 

Media Releases

Halifax EMC awards more than $7,000 to local teachers through Bright Ideas Education Grant Program

Halifax EMC has awarded $7,279 in Bright Ideas education grants to ten local teachers to fund engaging projects for their students. More than 570 students at schools in Halifax and Warren counties will benefit from these grants.

Since the Bright Ideas grant program began in 1994, Halifax EMC has contributed more than $179,000 to local teachers.

Typically, these grants bring creative projects to life inside classrooms. However, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Halifax EMC has been flexible with the types of projects awarded to ensure that all students are able to benefit, whether they are in the classroom or learning remotely. Grants are awarded for projects in all subject areas, such as music, art, history, reading, science, math, and more.

Halifax EMC is one of 26 electric cooperatives in North Carolina offering Bright Ideas grants to local teachers. Since 1994, North Carolina’s electric cooperatives collectively have awarded more than $12.9 million in Bright Ideas funding for nearly 12,359 projects supporting teachers and benefitting more than 2.5 million students.

Bright Ideas grant applications are accepted by Halifax EMC each year from April through mid-September, and winning proposals are selected in a competitive evaluation process by a panel of judges. The application process will reopen for interested teachers in April 2021.

The Bright Ideas grant program is part of Halifax EMC’s ongoing commitment to building a brighter future through community support of education.

Follow Halifax EMC on Facebook at @HalifaxEMC to see how programs, such as Bright Ideas, are impacting local students and communities. To learn more about Bright Ideas grants, visit ncbrightideas.com and follow @NCBrightIdeas on Facebook and Twitter.

2020 Halifax EMC’s Bright Ideas Education Grant Winners

Bright Ideas Grant Winner School Grant Name County Amount Awarded
Diane Colin Vaughan Elementary Don’t Stop the Music Warren $1,858
Pamela Richardson Inborden Elementary Learning New Moves Halifax $1,884
Susan Joyce, Tatyana Jackson, Evonne Harrison and Cynthia Mills Haliwa-Saponi Tribal School High School Distance Learning Writing Tablets Warren $2,000
Jacquelyn Ruffin-Pittman, Tracy Brinkley, Kenya Clemonts and Joseph Cirpriano Northwest Halifax High Outdoor Learning Tents Halifax $1,536
Media Releases

Halifax EMC Brings Electric Vehicle Fast Charging to Area

Halifax EMC is working with North Carolina’s Electric Cooperatives to expand a statewide cooperative electric vehicle charging network. Halifax EMC has partnered locally with New Dixie Oil and Robbie’s to strategically install a DC fast charger for public charging at Robbie’s on Highway 561 at I-95, Exit 160.

“Interstate 95 is a heavily traveled corridor, and an electric vehicle charging station will help draw visitors and economic activity to this area, while also supporting the environmental and cost-saving benefits of electric vehicles,” said Charles Guerry, Executive Vice President of Halifax EMC. “EVs offer numerous opportunities to both drivers and communities and bringing this charging station to Halifax EMC’s service area is an example of our commitment to building a brighter future for the people and communities we serve.”

The station is part of a $1 million investment North Carolina’s electric cooperatives are making in rural electric vehicle charging infrastructure across North Carolina. ChargePoint, an industry leader in EV charging infrastructure and networks, will supply the equipment and apply technical expertise in managing and installing the sites.

DC Fast Charge stations provide a very quick charge and can charge a depleted electric vehicle’s battery to 80 percent capacity in under 30 minutes. DC Fast Charge stations are usually located in high-traffic public areas or along major highway corridors.

The investment expands the existing electric cooperative EV charging network, which encompasses public charging stations at nearly 60 locations. Eight of North Carolina’s electric cooperatives were also recently awarded funding through the North Carolina Volkswagen Settlement to grow this network even further.

Driving electric offers significant cost savings, more convenience and less maintenance, a better driving experience, a healthier environment, a stronger local economy and a more efficient electric grid. EV buyers can also take advantage of a federal tax credit, and co-op members have access to a low interest EV loan and a special rebate when purchasing a new Nissan LEAF. Halifax EMC members can find more information about the impact of driving electric and find local EV benefits through our EV site.

Media Releases

Deadline Approaching for Local Teachers to Apply for Bright Ideas Grant

ENFIELD, N.C. – Time is running out for local K-12 teachers to apply for grants of up to $2,000 from Halifax EMC through the Bright Ideas Education Grant Program. Educators with creative ideas for projects for their students must submit their application by Sept. 15.  Interested teachers can find the application, along with grant-writing tips and program information, on the Bright Ideas website.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Halifax EMC is being flexible with grant criteria and the types of projects awarded this year. Teachers are encouraged to apply for innovative, creative projects that will benefit students whether they are in the classroom or learning remotely.

A total of $7,500 will be awarded by Halifax EMC to local educators for projects across all grade levels and subjects. Teachers at qualifying schools in Halifax and Warren counties can apply for grants individually or as a team.

Halifax EMC is one of 26 electric cooperatives in North Carolina offering Bright Ideas grants to local teachers. Since 1994, North Carolina’s electric cooperatives have awarded more than $12.9 million in Bright Ideas funding for nearly 12,359 projects supporting teachers and benefiting more than 2.5 million students.

The Bright Ideas grant program is part of Halifax EMC’s ongoing commitment to community and education. To learn more about this and other community outreach efforts, visit our community segment.

Media Releases, Spotlight

Co-op Community Loan Program Assists Inez VFD

Inez Volunteer Fire Department Receives $280,000 Zero-Interest Loan to Purchase New Truck

Enfield, NC (January 15, 2019) – Inez Volunteer Fire Department received a ten-year, $280,000 zero-interest loan from Halifax Electric Membership Corporation to purchase a new customized 2019 Freightliner 2000 Gallon Wetside Tanker Truck.

The funds were made possible primarily by a $233,300 grant from the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Rural Economic Development Loan and Grant program (REDLG) awarded to Halifax EMC for their recently established Community Revolving Loan program. The program provides zero-interest funds to local electric cooperatives who in turn lend the money to local entities for projects that support rural areas.

“Halifax EMC’s community loan program continues to grow thanks to REDLG funding and we are proud to support another project benefiting emergency response,” Halifax EMC Executive Vice President Charles H. Guerry said. “The cooperative’s structure was created to support the community. This zero-interest loan program allows us to support our communities far beyond our electric service.”

Halifax EMC is a local, member-owned, not-for-profit electric cooperative serving more than 10,000 electric members in Halifax, Warren, and parts of Nash and Martin counties. Visit www.halifaxemc.com for more information.

Pictured with the new truck are: (back row) Charles Guerry, Halifax EMC executive vice president; Stan Brothers, HEMC board president; Harry Williams, HEMC board; Macon Robertson, HEMC board; and Warren County Sheriff Johnny Williams. (front row): Emmanuel Gbedee, the Office of Congressman G.K. Butterfield; Alan Sweeney, Inez VFD assistant chief; Robin Williams, HEMC board; Christina Piard, the Office of Congressman G.K. Butterfield; BettyJo Shepheard, the Office of U.S. Senator Richard Burr; Melissa Williams, Inez VFD member; James Williams, Inez VFD secretary; and Christopher Reid, Inez VFD member.
Pictured with the new truck are: (back row) Charles Guerry, Halifax EMC executive vice president; Stan Brothers, HEMC board president; Harry Williams, HEMC board; Macon Robertson, HEMC board; and Warren County Sheriff Johnny Williams. (front row): Emmanuel Gbedee, the Office of Congressman G.K. Butterfield; Alan Sweeney, Inez VFD assistant chief; Robin Williams, HEMC board; Christina Piard, the Office of Congressman G.K. Butterfield; BettyJo Shepheard, the Office of U.S. Senator Richard Burr; Melissa Williams, Inez VFD member; James Williams, Inez VFD secretary; and Christopher Reid, Inez VFD member.